Combatting violence against African foreign nationals: A criminological approach towards community safety in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa

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DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2022/vn71a8802

Abstract

South Africa has seen waves of collective xenophobic violence and daily criminal attacks targeting foreign migrants. This study interviewed foreign nationals from African countries living in Durban. Through the lens of strain theory, it explores possible solutions to combat violence against foreign nationals in South Africa. The findings suggest the need to address poverty, socioeconomic integration, community participation, and skills. This will reduce strain and build social cohesion. 

The government should also revise the Immigration Act to accommodate foreign nationals who legally find themselves within its borders. This revision should take into consideration the suffering of foreigners and reduce any restrictive measures that limit their socioeconomic integration. 

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Author Biographies

Samuel Fikiri Cinini, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Samuel Fikiri Cinini holds a doctorate degree in Criminology and Forensic Studies from the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN), South Africa. He is currently a Research fellow of Criminology and Criminal Justice in the School of Applied Human Sciences at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. His recent publications include University Campuses and Types of Crime: A Case Study of the University of KwaZulu Natal/Howard Campus in the City of Durban, South Africa (Cogent Social Sciences, 2022). His areas of research are policing, public safety and security, criminal justice, xenophobia and migrants. 

Sazelo Mkhize, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Dr Sazelo Mkhize is currently a Senior Lecturer in Criminology and Forensic Studies, in the College of Humanities at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. He has received an award for the best emerging scholar from the School of Applied Human Sciences. Sazelo’s research focuses on police culture, victimisation, crime prevention, and community violence. 

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Published

2022-11-25

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Research articles